• Andy Warhol

    Andy Warhol was an American artist who was a leading figure in the visual art movement known as pop art. His works explore the relationship between artistic expression, celebrity culture and advertisement that flourished by the 1960s. After a successful career as a commercial illustrator, Warhol became a renowned and sometimes controversial artist. The Andy Warhol Museum in his native city, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, holds an extensive permanent collection of art and archives. It is the largest museum in the United States dedicated to a single artist. Warhol's art used many types of media, including hand drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, silk…

  • Sister Mary Corita Kent

    Corita Kent, aka Sister Mary Corita Kent, was born Frances Elizabeth Kent in Fort Dodge, Iowa. Kent was an American Catholic nun, an artist, and an educator who worked in Los Angeles and Boston. She worked almost exclusively with silkscreen, or serigraphy, helping to establish it as a fine art medium. Her artwork, with its messages of love and peace, was particularly popular during the social upheavals of the 1960s and 1970s. Kent designed the 1985 United States Postal Service's annual "love" stamp. Upon entering the Roman Catholic order of Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary in Los Angeles…

  • Stanley (Mouse) George Miller

    Stanley George Miller, better known as Mouse and Stanley Mouse, is an American artist, notable for his 1960s psychedelic rock concert poster designs for the Grateful Dead and Journey albums cover art. Born in Fresno, California, Miller grew up in Detroit, Michigan. He was given the nickname Mouse as a ninth grader. He was expelled from Mackenzie High School (Michigan) in 1956 for mischievously repainting the facade at The Box, a popular restaurant across the street from Mackenzie. Following his junior year at nearby Cooley High School, Mouse completed his formal education at Detroit's Society of Arts and Crafts. By…

  • Bert Stern

    Bertram "Bert" Stern was a self-taught American commercial photographer. He was the son of Jewish immigrants and grew up in Brooklyn. His father worked as a children’s portrait photographer. After dropping out of high school at the age of 16, he gained a job in the mail room at Look magazine. He became art director at Mayfair magazine, where Stern learned how to develop film and make contact sheets, and started taking his own pictures. In 1951, Stern was drafted into the US Army and was sent to Japan and assigned to the photographic department. In the 1960s, his heavy…

  • Raymond Savignac

    Raymond Savignac was born November 6, 1907. His parents had moved to Paris to overcome their difficult living conditions and attempted, through their work, to become their own bosses. They bought a small workers restaurant and did well. Despite his dreams of becoming a professional cyclist, At the age of 15 Savignac decided to quit school and become a draftsman. He spent a miserable time drawing and coloring bus maps for the Compagnie des Transports Parisiens. At this job he discovered caricature drawing thanks to one of his elder colleagues. For the little boy he was, his parents café was…

  • Michael McCoy

    Michael McCoy (on right) is an American industrial designer and educator who has made significant contributions to American design and design education in the latter half of the 20th century. McCoy is best known as the co-chair of the graduate program in Design at Cranbrook Academy of Art where he and spouse Katherine McCoy pioneered semantic approaches to design. Education and career Michael McCoy graduated from Michigan State University with a degree in Industrial Design. During his career as an Industrial Designer, McCoy has worked with corporations such as Philips Electronics, Formica Corporation, NEC, Steelcase among many. As a designer,…

  • Adolf Behne

    Adolf Behne was a critic, art historian, architectural writer, and artistic activist. He was one of the leaders of the Avant Garde in the Weimar Republic.Behne was born in Magdeburg and studied architecture briefly, then the history of art in Berlin. He joined the Deutscher Werkbund and was a guiding light of the Arbeitsrat für Kunst in 1918. In a 1913 critique of Bruno Taut, Behne helped coin the term "Expressionist architecture", and soon became one of the leading promoters of expressionism. He was close to the members of the Magdeburg artist collective 'The ball' and demanded the creation of…

  • ARTnews (periodical)

    ARTnews is an American visual-arts magazine, based in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York. It covers art from ancient to contemporary times. It includes news dispatches from correspondents, investigative reports, reviews of exhibitions, and profiles of artists and collectors.The magazine was founded by James Clarence Hyde in 1902 as Hydes Weekly Art News and is published eleven times a year. From vol. 3, no. 52 (November 5, 1904) to vol. 21, no. 18 (February 10, 1923), the magazine was published as American Art News. From February 1923 to the present, the magazine has been published as ARTnews.…

  • Ettore Sottsass

    Ettore Sottsass was an Italian architect and designer of the late 20th century. His body of designs included furniture, jewelry, glass, lighting and office machine design. Sottsass was born on 14 September 1917 in Innsbruck, Austria, and grew up in Milan, where his father was an architect. He was educated at the Politecnico di Torino in Turin and graduated in 1939 with a degree in architecture. He served in the Italian military and spent much of World War II in a concentration camp in Yugoslavia. After returning home in 1948, he set up his own architectural and industrial design studio…

  • Andrew Altmann

    Andy Altmann graduated in graphic design from the Royal College of Art in 1987 and almost immediately formed the multi-disciplinary design group Why Not Associates with fellow graduates David Ellis and Howard Greenhalgh. Over the years, the group has gained an international reputation based on its creative and experimental approach.From Eye Magazine on Why Not in 1992: In less than five years as a formal partnership, Why Not Associates have come to occupy a pivotal position on the experimental wing of British graphic design. They are leading figures among a handful of London-based companies increasingly perceived on the larger international…

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Hans Rudi Erdt was a German graphic designer, lithographer and commercial artist known for his contributions to the Sachplakat movement created by Lucian Bernhard. His work at the prestigious Hollerbaum und Schmidt art printing company along with Edmund Edel, Hans Lindenstadt, Julius Klinger, Julius Gipkens, Paul Scheurich and Karl Schulpig make him one of the most important representatives of German poster art between 1906 and 1918. Erdt has also been recognized for his innovative use of typography in posters.

 

Poster 192033 Z

Born in Benediktbeuern, Bavaria, he trained as a lithographer and became a student of Maximilian Dasio at the Munich School of Applied Arts. He joined Hollerbaum und Schmidt around 1908, becoming part of the "Berlin School", where he created what is considered one of the most enduring examples of Sachplakat, an advertisement for the nascent racing division of the Opel car manufacturer.

 

Erdt   Batschari1 Jugend 1914

During World War I he created propaganda posters for the German State Film Committee,as well as promotional posters for propaganda films, some of which, like U Boote Heraus! became quite famous at the time.

 

Hans Rudi Erdt1317279991407

His advertising work varied, from Nivea to illustrated weekly newspapers such as Die Woche, tourism and travel events and tobacco companies such as Batschari, Manoli and Mahala Problem.

Erdt died in Berlin of tuberculosis at the age of 35.

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