Capitalis Quadrata

The Capitalis Quadrata (also Quadrata, square script or Capitalis elegans) is an ancient Roman typeface. Following the example of their chiseled in stone variant of Capitalis monumentalis, the square script was used in addition to the canonical Capitalis as a book hand of the Romans.

The name Quadrata derives from the geometrical shape of the individual letters, which is based on the square, equilateral triangle and circle. Like the Capitalis monumentalis the square script is with serifs quoted, word division and ligatures are rare.

From the second half of the 1st Century AD to the end of the 3rd Century AD saw the square script under the emperors Augustus, Tiberius, to Trajan, Hadrian and Marcus Aurelius during its peak. They remained in use until the 6th Century, in individual luxury manuscripts and as a typeface it is even found in the 9th Century.

Capitalis Quadrata

Capitalis Quadrata

While the Capitalis quadrata was used for luxury manuscripts in particular texts used in Roman Classical, were canonical Capitalis with its narrower and less geometrically formed letters. Seen as a more delicate and less imposing standard book typeface. For this was a cursive variant of the Capitalis for everyday purposes in use, the older Roman cursive (Majuskelkursive), which was more suitable for the loose and volatile writing.

2017 History of Graphic Design

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