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Andrew Altmann

Andy Altmann graduated in graphic design from the Royal College of Art in 1987 and almost immediately formed the multi-disciplinary design group...

THE DIGITAL REVOLUTION AND BEYOND

By the early 21 century, many people had become dependent on the internet for information and entertainment. Because of these advanced in...

Fred Woodward

A select group of magazine editors, designers, and other denizens of publishing’s late hours will remember Fred Woodward this way: sitting in...